Patrick Bunam KILLEEN, 18261884 (age 58 years)

Name
Patrick Bunam KILLEEN
Birth 1826
MarriageCatherine E ROONEYView this family
February 17, 1851 (Age 25 years)
Shared note:
Alt. MarriageCatherine E ROONEYView this family
Wakefield Twsp, Gatineau, Quebc, Can
February 17, 1851 (Age 25 years)

Birth of a son
#1
Bernard B KILLEEN
September 12, 1854 (Age 28 years)
Birth of a son
#2
Michael J KILLEEN
February 19, 1855 (Age 29 years)
Baptism of a sonMichael J KILLEEN
February 25, 1855 (Age 29 years)

Birth of a son
#3
Thomas J KILLEEN
April 1858 (Age 32 years)
Birth of a son
#4
Patrick Joseph KILLEEN
July 14, 1859 (Age 33 years)
Baptism of a sonPatrick Joseph KILLEEN
July 24, 1859 (Age 33 years)

Birth of a daughter
#5
Mary Ann KILLEEN
February 9, 1860 (Age 34 years)
Birth of a daughter
#6
Catherine Judith KILLEEN
about 1862 (Age 36 years)
Birth of a son
#7
Dennis KILLEEN
March 25, 1864 (Age 38 years)
Baptism of a sonDennis KILLEEN
March 27, 1864 (Age 38 years)

Birth of a daughter
#8
Elizabeth Bridget KILLEEN
January 24, 1870 (Age 44 years)
Death of a daughterCatherine Judith KILLEEN
October 13, 1875 (Age 49 years)
Marriage of a childMichael FLAHAVENMary Ann KILLEENView this family
1880 (Age 54 years)
Marriage of a childThomas J KILLEENMary Louisa GRUBERView this family
October 25, 1881 (Age 55 years)
Marriage of a childBernard B KILLEENMary Ann MEAGHERView this family
October 26, 1881 (Age 55 years)

Death April 4, 1884 (Age 58 years)
Family with Catherine E ROONEY
himself
18261884
Birth: 1826Roscommon Co, Ireland
Death: April 4, 1884Raymond, Stearns Co, MN
wife
18261901
Birth: 1826 43 42Clare, Ireland
Death: January 31, 1901Fort Steele, British Columbia, Canada
Marriage
Marriage: February 17, 1851Wakefield, Quebec, Canada
4 years
son
18541927
Birth: September 12, 1854 28 28Wakefield Twsp, Quebec, Can
Death: February 13, 1927Minneapolis, Hennepin Co, MN
5 months
son
18551944
Birth: February 19, 1855 29 29Wakefield Twsp, Gatineau Co, Quebec, Can
Death: June 28, 1944St. Cloud, Stearns Co, MN
3 years
son
18581928
Birth: April 1858 32 32New York
Death: August 20, 1928St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota
16 months
son
18591931
Birth: July 14, 1859 33 33Wakefield Twsp, Quebec, Can
Death: June 30, 1931Sedan, Pope Co, MN
7 months
daughter
18601935
Birth: February 9, 1860 34 34Wakefield Twsp, Quebec, Can
Death: December 12, 1935Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, USA
3 years
daughter
18621875
Birth: about 1862 36 36Canada
Death: October 13, 1875Padua, Raymond, Stearns Co, MN
2 years
son
1864
Birth: March 25, 1864 38 38Wakefield Twsp, Gatineau Co, Quebec, Can
Death:
6 years
daughter
18701962
Birth: January 24, 1870 44 44Sauk Centre, Stearns Co, MN
Death: August 25, 1962San Jose, Santa Clara, California
MarriageView

St. Camillus Church

Note

Patrick Killeen and his wife Catherine Rooney were natives of County Claire, Ireland and came to North America in about 1837, where were put ashore at Grosse Island, Canada. There were several immigrant Rooney families landed at that place and they moved farther inland and settled in Wakefield Township where they were employed in the timber lands.

When his work in Wakefield Township was finished, Patrick KIlleen removed his family to New York City where Michael was born in 1855. He returned to Canada but was not satisfied to stay there and as there was a big land boom in Minnesota just at that time he decided to locate there. He boarded a steam boat at Lake Superior and came to St. Paul by way of the Mississippi about 1863. He secured an ox team in St. Paul and made his way overland to Stearns County where he obtained 160 acres in Section 24, Raymond township. He hired Joe McDermatt, who had a team of horses and a plow, to put in his first crop which was 10 acres of wheat.

While Indians were always lurking around the lakes near the Killeen home they were never hostile. They stole everything they could, but did not attempt to harm the settlers bodily. One night, Catherine (Rooney) Killeen left her washing on the clothes line, thinking it would dry by morning and when she went out to get the clothing found that Indians had stolen it during the night. It was a very real loss to the Killeen's as they did not have an over abundance of clothing and nothing out of which to make more.

Although, there was a store at Sauk Centre at the time, the Killeens did most of their trading in St Cloud. Eggs were 8 cents per dozen and butter 5 cents per pound.